Experimental Watercolor Technique Sheet

Experimental Watercolor Technique Sheet

sketchbook-watercolor-test8
sketchbook-watercolor-test8

The art of painting with  watercolor is a delicate balance between water and paint. Teaching young students how to find that balance is tricky, some are heavy handed and some barely dab the brush on the paper. Experimenting with several techniques can help develop a unique process and style. Plus, it can turn into a handy  reference tool when added to a sketchbook.

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sketchbook-watercolor-test7

To start, use a ruler to grid out 2-3 inch rows and columns using a thin Sharpie. Add an extra line to each row for a short description. You could show several examples for students to choose from and then let them explore different techniques on their own. An added bonus to this lesson is teaching kids how to be resourceful by using what's on hand. I used crayons, reinforcements, scrapers of different sizes, Kosher salt, oil pastels, q-tips, twigs, cotton balls, a cut up dish sponge, masking fluid, Elmer's glue, sugar, leaves, bubble wrap, a straw (I blew through the straw at the wet paint), a variety of brush sizes, rubbing alcohol (dabbed on with a cotton ball before using the watercolor), and a small spray bottle. There is a dry time needed for some of these steps, but in the end you'll have a fun activity that's cool to look at and a teaching tool for future projects.

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sketchbook-watercolor-test6
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sketchbook-watercolor-test4
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sketchbook-watercolor-test3
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sketchbook-watercolor-test5
Dale Chihuly Style Plastic Water Bottle Chandelier

Dale Chihuly Style Plastic Water Bottle Chandelier

Modern Cardboard House

Modern Cardboard House