The story of Team Dillo and the Batarmaghorn or 3D printing in the art room

The story of Team Dillo and the Batarmaghorn or 3D printing in the art room

Last week I attended a 3D printing workshop for RRISD art educators. We used a Dremel 3D printer and Tinkercad,  an easy-to-use 3D CAD design tool you can find on the web. The lovely Kera Nellor was our instructor and I wish she came with each 3D printer. Below you will find a sketchnote from the 3-hour session and pictures of Team Dillo; myself, Amie Gonser of Blackland Prairie Elementary and Trish Massari of Fulkes MIddle School.

Our design challenge was to create a piece of sculpture to help Keep Austin Wierd. As I was fresh from NAEA's Design Thinking conference, I recognized Kera's use of design methodology; logic, imagination, intuition, and systemic reasoning, to explore our possibilities.  The sculpture we designed morphed 3 well known Texas animals; a bat + an armadillo + a Longhorn = a  batarmaghorn. We made our first prototype from homemade playdough provided by Kera.

Amie signed on to Tinkercad using her Google + account and started experimenting with its action buttons and arrows. Out of the three of us, I had the most experience with Tinkercad, and was passed the laptop. I listened to Amie's & Trish's suggestions on how best to create the armadillo and soon enough he started coming together. But if we wanted to use the 3D printer our design needed to be small and done in an hour. 

Though only in its armadillo stage, our design was the furthest one along so Kera chose ours to print, and as you can see, it is tiny. Our armadillo took 21 minutes to print and measured 5 cm long x 1 1/2 cm wide x 1 1/2 cm high. We were relieved that our prototype came out with minimal spaghetti, and what Kera doomed as the curse of bad 3d print design. Go Team Dillo!

 NAEA's SummerStudio: Design Thinking for Social Equity 2017 Reflection

NAEA's SummerStudio: Design Thinking for Social Equity 2017 Reflection