#NAEA2017 NYC: DAY 5 How to Read a Chinese Painting

#NAEA2017 NYC: DAY 5 How to Read a Chinese Painting

After touring the Asia wing at the MET on Monday I was excited to learn more about Chinese painting. I know what most people know about Chinese art; it reads right to left, the black brush marks look like squiggles, and nature and people look unrealistic when compared to western art. Yet there is a simplicity we admire. This lecture was led by Maxwell Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman, Department of Asian Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, who's command of the Chinese language gave the entire presentation a genuine and authentic feel. He was a wonderful speaker and I would love to go to another. Hearn opened the lecture stating that he loves speaking to art teachers as we are "at the forefront of cultural happenings and protectors of self-expression."  I liked him right away.

Hearn explained that to learn about Chinese painting you must first learn about the ancient art of Chinese calligraphy. It takes a lifetime for an artist to master brushstrokes that capture the essence of the word, and the same can be said for visual expression.

After today's lecture, I can say that I have a new appreciation and respect for Chinese art and look forward to learning more.

Maxwell Hearn, the new head of Asian Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, demonstrates the ancient art of understanding and appreciating Chinese scroll paintings. 
By Rob Harris | Mar. 17, 2011

 

After the lecture, I found the Soup Man around the corner from my hotel. Lobster bisque, plus they give you a Lindt Chocolate ball and a tangerine;)

 

 

 

A Walk Through Central Park

A Walk Through Central Park

#NAEA2017 NYC: Day 4 Exhibit Hall @HiltonHotel

#NAEA2017 NYC: Day 4 Exhibit Hall @HiltonHotel